On this day in 1969, the Beatles issued a press release informing the world that Paul McCartney was not dead. Seven years later, Paul released a single called “Let ‘Em In,” proving that, while his body was still alive, his ability to write good songs wasn’t.

At the time, it was hard to believe that the guy who wrote all those Beatles classics, solo albums like “Ram,” and Wings albums like “Band On The Run,” was responsible for this drivel — and even worse that it became a top 3 hit in the US and UK.

How bad was it? Sample the not-so-brilliant lyrics to “Let ‘Em In” for yourself.

Someone’s knockin’ at the door
Somebody’s ringin’ the bell
Someone’s knockin’ at the door
Somebody’s ringin’ the bell
Do me a favor, open the door and let ’em in

Had Paul’s life become so insulated that he couldn’t get out of the chair and open the damn door himself? He then lists the people who are knocking at the door that he wants you to let in, from sister Suzie to brother John, Martin Luther to Phil and Don (ooh, a civil rights leader and the Everly Brothers, who have so much in common). Then repeat ad nauseum.

As the years have rolled by, McCartney’s abilities have atrophied even further. Witness this masterpiece from last year called “Dance Tonight,” which he played ukulele¬†mandolin on:

Everybody gonna dance tonight
Everybody gonna feel all right
Everybody gonna dance around tonight

Everybody gonna dance around
Everybody gonna hit the ground
Everybody gonna dance around tonight

Well you can come on to my place if you want to
You can do anything you want to do

Everybody gonna dance tonight
Everybody gonna feel all right
Everybody gonna dance around tonight

Imagine a new songwriter trying to sell that to a singer or label. They’d be thrown out of the office. But, in Paul’s case, it’s his office, dead or not.